Some of the Many Wonders of Pencils

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Hey look, I rescued more pencils!

(translation: “Hey look, I bought another bag of junk at SAVERS!”)

They aren’t bags of junk, though. They’re bags of wonder.

For example, I wonder, “Who were the Wissahickons?”

And I wonder, “Can I find out who the Wissahickons are without going on the internet?”

[We interrupt this program to bring you an Update on the Situation:

I asked one of my well-travelled guitar students if he knew anything about the Wissahickon tribe and he told me he thought were probably from the Pennsylvania region.

A few days later I ran into this unlikely title at a Goodwill store…

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Close one. I’ll have to keep my eyes out. We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming…]

I wonder, “What sport, and where, and when, did the Wissahickon Trojans play?”

I wonder, “Are they from around here (Southern New Hampshire)?”

I wonder, “How and why did someone end up with all of these Wissahickon Trojans pencils?”

I wonder, “Why did they haveĀ exactly fifty Wissahickon Trojans pencils?”

(As I counted them, I was hoping it wouldn’t be an even number. Odd numbers are funnier. It would have been funnier if there were 49 of them. It would have been a lot funnier if there were 47. I wonder, “Why is 47 funnier than 50?”)

And I wonder, “Why would anyone would donate fifty perfectly good pencils to SAVERS?”

I wonder, “Do they think they’ll never have a use for a nice blue pencil again?”

“How is that even possible?” I wonder.

 

 

2 responses

  1. Hey Danny,

    I remember a Wissahickon Creek outside Philadelphia, where I grew up, and also a Wissahickon High School in the area. I think the Wissahickons were a Woodland Indian group related to the Delawares, but my memory has been faithless in the past.

    Charles

  2. There IS no junk at Savers. How dare you besmirch their practically infinite selection of “sub-desirable castoffs.”

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